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ASEAN TVET COUNCIL 3RD REGIONAL POLICY DIALOGUE

“RESKILLING AND UPSKILLING IN ASEAN”


Date:
28. Feb 2024 - 29. Feb 2024

Location:
Bali, Indonesia, Global

Organizer:
GIZ; Aus4ASEAN; Ministry of Education, Singapore; TESDA, Philippines; TUT Wuri Handayani, Indonesia; ASEAN

Event type:
Conference
3rd-atc-rpdgroup-1

About the Event

ATC cover banner

BACKGROUND

In an increasingly digitalized and globalized world, the labour market dynamics are shifting more rapidly than ever before. Technological advancements have altered the nature of work, leading to the displacement of traditional occupations and the emergence of new ones. This displacement/creation paradigm is also playing at a functional level where specific tasks within occupations are being transformed by technology creating turbulence within occupations. These changes to traditional occupations and the specific tasks undertaken by workers in different job roles will be exacerbated by digital transformation, in particular by the development of generative Artificial Intelligence (AI)1.

To adapt to these transformations and ensure the continuity and enhancement of ASEAN’s workforce, there is a dire need for strategic and targeted and continuous reskilling and upskilling of the workforce. The ASEAN TVET Council recognizes the importance of these measures and plans to convene its 3rd Regional Policy Dialogue in February 2024, with a thematic focus on "Reskilling and Upskilling in ASEAN", which is in line with its Workplan Key result area “Promote reskilling and upskilling for all”.

Recent research by McKinsey estimates 30 percent of hours currently worked in the US economy could be automated by 2030 as a result of generative AI, according to McKinsey Global Institute (2023) Generative AI and the future of work in America


ASEAN TVET COUNCIL’S REGIONAL POLICY DIALOGUE

The ATC RPD is a forum for mutual learning and exchange on TVET policy and practice in the ASEAN region. It is a forum for:

  • Mutual learning by bringing together representatives from politics & academia, public institutions, and business community on an equal footing;
  • Reflecting on state-of-the-art research and practical examples from the ASEAN region and beyond;
  • Identification and documentation of progress, challenges and lessons learned and setting of a future agenda for analysis and further exploration; and
  • Providing general recommendations for the further development of TVET at the ASEAN regional level.

This will feed into the Outcome 5 of the ATC Work Plan 2021-2030 which highlighted a Strengthened and effective ATC as an institution in the region.This will feed into the Outcome 5 of the ATC Work Plan 2021-2030 which highlighted a Strengthened and effective ATC as an institution in the region.

This ATC Regional Policy Dialogue (RPD) is the third event in a series intended to inform the joint work on the ATC Work Plan at the regional level as much as the debates on HRD and TVET reforms in AMS with a focus on policy implementation. The 2-day conference brings together members of the ATC with leading academics and practitioners from the ASEAN region and beyond.

The RPD on the topic “Reskilling and Upskilling in ASEAN” is co-hosted by the ATC Chair - the Ministry of Education of Singapore (MOE), the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Research and Technology (MoECRT) of Indonesia, with support of the ASEAN Secretariat, the Australian government’s Aus4ASEAN Digital Transformation and Future Skills Initiative and the German government’s Regional Cooperation for the Development of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (RECOTVET) programme.


 OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOME

The primary aim of the policy dialogue is to develop a collective understanding of the current status quo, identify primary challenges, and explore promising avenues for the future of reskilling and upskilling in the ASEAN region. The event aspires to facilitate an in-depth discussion on national, regional, and international best practices and thereby shed light on effective strategies for nurturing a resilient and future-ready workforce. The dialogue also intends to address the gender-specific aspects of reskilling and upskilling, acknowledging the unique hurdles encountered by different demographic groups. Specific issues that will be discussed include:

  • How to improve demand forecasting for specific occupations and job functions
  • The changing demands of industry including the balance between technical skills and broader competencies;
  • Public private cooperation targeting to enhance labour market efficiency and toward a just transition;
  • The interplay between accredited and non-accredited courses / modules to accelerate the reskilling agenda and ensure that TVET is more agile and responsible to demand;
  • How to utilise the untapped potential of women and appropriately address re/upskilling with a gender-specific approach;
  • Workforce capability building for a digitized world where AI is becoming higher on the agenda;
  • Exploring the impact of generative AI on teaching and assessment, and on different occupations and industries in ASEAN and the implications for TVET institutions; and
  • Policy considerationsars related to privacy, cyber security and pedagogy.

A significant outcome of the dialogue shall be well-structured policy recommendations and a list of potential project ideas. These will be designed to align with the ATC's priorities and workplan activities, providing a strategic framework for addressing the challenges and opportunities presented by the evolving labour market. Potential projects will be considered for funding through the normal proposal process for the Australia for ASEAN (Aus4ASEAN) Futures Initiative.

The results of discussion at the ATC RPD and recommendations will be processed into documentation to inform ATC members in their implementation of the ATC Work plan. Moreover, the recommendations and results can be brought to the attention of the relevant sectoral bodies of ASEAN, where they can serve as orientation for the further development of HRD and TVET in ASEAN.

All RPD inputs and outcomes are made available on SEA-VET.NET, the TVET platform for Southeast Asia.


PARTICIPANTS

The policy dialogue brought together a diverse set of stakeholders involved in human resource development, labour market and TVET systems issues in the ASEAN region. Participants will include representatives from economic, educational, and labour sectors, ASEAN sectoral bodies, academia, international experts, and the private sector - recognizing the crucial role of the private sector in informing and implementing reskilling and upskilling strategies, their inclusion will foster a holistic understanding and concerted action towards meeting the region's labour market demands. As ASEAN’s Dialogue Partner and Development Partner, Australia and Germany will ensure representation from their respective government, industry and institutional counterparts.

3rd ATC RPD Group 2

Participants in the event include the focal points of the ATC and relevant stakeholders in the region and beyond:

    • Representatives from the economic, education, and labour sectors from AMS (SEOM, SOM-ED, SLOM focal points)
    • Representatives from business and industry sector (ASEAN Future Workforce Council, ASEAN Business Advisory Council (ABAC)), other private sector representatives, companies from ASEAN region, national chambers of commerce and industry, associations, and HR managers
    • ASEAN sectoral bodies and other relevant stakeholders (ASEAN Secretariat, SEAMEO VOCTECH, ASEAN Confederation of Employers (ACE), etc.)
    • TVET professionals from ASEAN member states, independent consultants and academics
    • Australian technical experts from Jobs and Skills, TAFE NSW, TAFE Cyber, Deakin University, Griffith University, RMIT University

 


PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 1: COMMON GROUND AND MEGA-TRENDS AFFECTING RESKILLING AND UPSKILLING IN ASEAN

This session aims to create mutual understandings and a ground for discussion of reskilling and upskilling in the ASEAN region. Mega-trends that affect the future world of work in the ASEAN region as well as the movement toward the so-called twin transition – digital and green transition –  digital and green transition – will be addressed to set the base for policy implication.

Moderator: Ms. Claire Field, Managing Director, Claire Field and Associates, Australia.

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION

PANEL DISCUSSION

  1. Ms. Nuchjarin Sairadtong, Director of Skill Training System Section, Department of Skill Development, Ministry of Labour, Thailand
  2. Ir. Ts. Bibi Hazrina bt. Alli Rahman, Head of Training (Asset and Safety), TNB Integrated Learning Solutions (TNB ILSAS), Malaysia
  3. Mr. Marlon Mina, Executive Director, Human Resources Development Foundation, Philippines Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI), Philippines
  4. Dr. Achim D. Schmillen, Practice Leader for Human Development for Indonesia and Timor-Leste, World Bank
  5. Prof. David Peetz, Department of Employment Relations and Human Resources, Griffith University, Australia (virtually).

PLENARY SESSION 2: RESKILLING AND UPSKILLING AS AN INSTRUMENT OF ACTIVE LABOUR MARKET POLICY

This session will view reskilling and upskilling measures as an instrument to resolve skill mismatch and facilitate a more efficient labour market. Monitoring and evaluation of reskilling and upskilling and its effect on skill matching will be discussed in regard with labour market policies implication

Moderator: Ms. Claire Field, Managing Director, Claire Field and Associates, Australia.

SPEAKERS

1. Dr. Lukas Kleine-Rueschkamp, Coordinator – Local Labour Market Analysis, Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities, OECD.

2. Mr. Yeo Wee Siong, Director, Jobs-Skills Insights Division, SkillsFuture Singapore


PLENARY SESSION 3: IMPACT AND APPLICATION OF GENERATIVE AI ON RESKILLING AND UPSKILLING

This session explains different forms of generative AI and their impact on industries including business administration, IT, marketing, health, creative industries, and construction. Education and the skills training sector are also undergoing change as a result of generative AI. Participants will learn how generative AI is impacting how educators teach and assess to ensure academic integrity, as well as what is taught – to ensure learners are prepared for changing occupations in the era of generative AI.

Moderator: Ms. Claire Field, Managing Director, Claire Field and Associates, Australia.

SPEAKERS

1. Prof. Margaret Bearman, Research Professor, Center for Research in Assessment and Digital Learning, Portfolio of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Deakin University, Australia (virtually).

2. Mr. Timmy Theophelus, Vice President, Corporate Social Impact PT. Tera Data Indonusa and Education Programme Director for Axioo Class Program, Indonesia

COMMENTER


PLENARY SESSION 4: BUILDING A LIFELONG LEARNING CULTURE IN ASEAN

Moderator: Ms. Claire Field, Managing Director, Clair Field and Associates, Australia

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE

Like many other regions and countries in the world, the society and families in ASEAN see the importance and invest in education for their children. Apparently, a lot of focus and resources are put on people’s first diplomas but less for the rest, especially after they start to work. Education as a life-long concept seems not yet popular in the society as a culture.

This session discussed the needs and measures for aligning reskilling and upskilling at the national and regional level to build a lifelong learning culture at the ASEAN level. It showcased examples of leading countries and regional initiates together with sharing lessons learnt, on-going challenges and recommendation for further cooperation.

AGENDA AND SESSION INPUTS

1. Dr. Suneeti Rekhari, Director Educational Quality and Ms. Sanja Taslaman, Senior Manager Education Quality and Assurance, TAFE NSW, Australia.

2. Ms. Lynn Ng, Senior Manager, Temasek Polytechnic, Singapore

3. Ms. Philany Phisamai, Deputy director General, Department of Non-formal Education, Ministry of Education and Sports, Lao PDR

GUIDING QUESTIONS

  • When a person is already qualified for and satisfied with their current jobs, should they stop learning? Should society and their companies expect (and allow resources for) them to continue learning?
  • Do the cultures in ASEAN countries need to adjust to encourage lifelong learning? How can the concept of lifelong learning be delivered to people, especially from the very early age?
  • How should a national system that supports lifelong learning look like?
  • How can a lifelong learning culture accelerate more opportunities for women at work?
  • What can be done to promote lifelong learning as a regional effort?

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

BREAKOUT SESSION 1A: ASSESSMENT OF RESKILLING AND UPSKILLING NEEDS

Moderator: Mr. Marlon Mina, Executive Director, Human Resources Development Foundation, Philippines Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI), Philippines.

OBJECTIVE

This session will explore methodologies of assessing reskilling and upskilling needs on a national level. Institutional representatives from ASEAN countries will have chance to share the experience, lessons learnt and challenges regarding assessing skill needs to inform skill policies. This session will feature piloting cases from the countries as examples of institutions applying a holistic approach into skill demands assessment.

AGENDA AND SESSION INPUTS

1. Mr. Jordi Prat TucaTechnical Specialist on Skills and the Future of Work, Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, International Labour Organization (ILO)

2. Dr. Jahen F. Rezki, Vice Director for Research, Institute for Economic and Social Research, Indonesia

COMMENTERS

  • Mrs. Lady Hanifah Mindalano-Alonto, Chief of Human Resource Management Division, Office of the Chief Minister - Bangsamoro Autonomous Region In Muslim Mindanao, the Philippines
  • Ms. Socheata Sou, National Project Coordinator, Youth employment, International Labour Organization (ILO)

GUIDING QUESTIONS

  • Why is assessment of reskilling and upskilling needs important, especially from a planning point of view?Why is assessment of reskilling and upskilling needs important, especially from a planning point of view?
  • How can skill needs assessment support reskilling and upskilling programs?
  • What are the practices of skill needs assessment from the private sector?
  • What are the methodologies used in skill needs assessment in the public sector? What are their pros and cons?
  • Have public institutions in ASEAN countries used any comprehensive methodology of skill needs assessment that consider both statistics from labour market and opinions of public and private sector stakeholders?
  • What is the experience of applying these methodologies? What are the main findings of the latest national skill needs assessment? What are the lessons learnt?

BREAKOUT SESSION 1B: RESKILLING AND UPSKILLING TOWARD A GREEN TRANSITION

Moderator: Dr. Lukas Kleine-Rueschkamp, Coordinator – Local Labour Market Analysis, Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities, OECD.

OBJECTIVES

This session puts emphasis on reskilling and upskilling as measures to address employment issues generated and affected by the transition to a greener future, including new job creation, green skill demands and unemployment due to reduction of brown industry jobs. The participants should be informed and discuss about how to establish and monitor structures to support green reskilling and upskilling with particular focus on workers in fossil-based industries.

AGENDA AND SESSION INPUTS

1.  Ms. Souphayvanh Thiengchanhxay, Board of Director of LNCCI/ Deputy Chief Operating Officer of Burapha Ago-Forestry Co., Ltd

2. Mrs. Kalaivani Ramachandran, Deputy Head of Diploma in Electronic (Computer) Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Sultan Idris Shah Polytechnic, Ministry of Higher Education, Malaysia

3. Dr. Dimple Quyn, Dean, Learning and Teaching Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Australia

GUIDING QUESTIONS

  • How to identify the needs for green skills?
  • What understandings need to be obtained from public and private stakeholders to create a willingness to reskill and upskill workers toward a green transition? What is needed to design such green skill programs?
  • What options of training for green skills do companies have (e.g. having company-owned training centres, cooperating with universities/TVET institutions, etc.) especially companies in the energy sector? Are the training options different for companies with different sizes?
  • What challenges are there to reskill and upskill workers in the brown industries? What solutions can be provided by stakeholders from public and private sectors?
  • What are some international examples of re/upskilling for the energy transition? What is the experience and lessons learnt?

BREAKOUT SESSION 2A: REAPING THE BENEFITS OF RESKILLING AND UPSKILLING WITH A GENDER-SPECIFIC APPROACH

Co-Moderators: Ms. Miriam Heidtmann, Programme Director, RECOTVET and Ms. Thu Nguyen, Programme Officer, RECOTVET

OBJECTIVES

This session discussed how gender-specific perspectives can enhance the results of skill programmes and bring positive economic development. It also showcased examples of how reskilling and upskilling can be implemented with a gender-response/gender-transformative approach that results in enrichment of talent pools for companies and society, as well as provide more people with decent employment opportunities.

AGENDA AND SESSION INPUTS

1. Mr. Laki Kondylas, Deputy Director of Centre for Cyber Security Research and Innovation, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), AustraliaMr. Laki Kondylas, Deputy Director of Centre for Cyber Security Research and Innovation, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), Australia

2. Mrs. Katherine Amor A. Zarsadias, Assistant Executive Director of Planning Office, and concurrent Chief of Policy Research and Evaluation Division and Labour Market Information Division of Planning Office, Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA), Philippines

3. Dr. Mo Salomon, Founder and Chief Navigator of Korumo Coaching for Transformation, Indonesia

GUIDING QUESTIONS

  • Do the same gender issues exist in all ASEAN countries? Shall the gender issues and approach to tackle these issues be different in each country?
  • How can reskilling and upskilling lead to utilisation of the untapped potential of women workers, which will later benefit the economy? Do private companies see the benefit of having a wider talent pool with participation of more women with more diverse skillsets?
  • Should reskilling and upskilling for women have different modalities? How can policy makers accelerate skill development programs with a gender-sensitive/responsive approach?
  • What are some practices in the ASEAN countries regarding reskilling and upskilling with a gender focus? What are the lessons learnt?
  • How to detect and challenge the gender stereotypes that limit the skill development and work opportunities of all genders?

BREAKOUT SESSION 2B: MODALITIES OF RESKILLING AND UPSKILLING IMPLEMENTATION

Moderator: Ms. Raihan Tahir, Founder and CEO, Training and Consultancy Exzellent Profis Sdn Bhd, Malaysia.

OBJECTIVES

The session will discuss challenges and experiences of countries in selecting and adjusting different modalities of reskilling and upskilling to fit with characteristics of different learner groups, programmes and types of skills, such as online vs face to face delivery, accredited vs non-accredited programs, etc.

AGENDA AND SESSION INPUTS

1. Mr. Khem Pisoth, Director, Department of Policy and Strategy, Ministry of Labour and Vocational Training (MLVT),  Cambodia.

2. Dr. Emma Cannen, Director in the Workforce Futures Branch, Jobs and Skills Australia.

3. Mr. Laksasak Yangsaman, Director of International Strategy and External Relations Division, Bureau of Policy and Planning, Office of Vocational Education Commission (OVEC), Ministry of Education, Thailand.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

  • What are the traditional and modern modalities of skill development? What are the major differences among them regarding time, duration, format of delivery, learner groups, etc.?
  • How to select the effective modalities for a particular reskilling and upskilling programs? What factors should be considered? What information needs to be obtained before select and develop the modalities?
  • What to be considered when designing the learning modalities for adult learners?
  • What are the examples of applying different skill development modalities in the ASEAN countries? What are the challenges and lessons learnt?
  • Are reskilling and upskilling necessarily trainings? What would be other potential modalities to ensure lifelong learning of workers in the companies / people in the society

BREAKOUT SESSION 3A: INVESTMENT DECISIONS OF VARIOUS STAKEHOLDERS IN RESKILLING AND UPSKILLING

Moderator: Dr. Paryono, Deputy Director of Professional Affairs and Research Manager, The SEAMEO Regional Centre for Vocational and Technical Education and Training (SEAMEO VOCTECH)

OBJECTIVE

While there is growing consensus about the crucial importance of up-/reskilling to keep up with rapidly changing labour markets, smaller firms and certain groups of workers, including lower-skilled workers and women, are at risk of being left behind. Leveraging insights from behavioural science, this session explores the motivations, behaviours, and decision-making process of individuals, firms and training institutions that can explain this exclusion and how to overcome it. Specifically, the session will highlight how psychological factors, social influences and belief systems can affect stakeholders’ perceived costs and benefits of engaging in up-/reskilling and discuss new approaches to make up-/reskilling more inclusive.

KICK-OFF PRESENTATION

PANEL DISCUSSION

    • Mr. Ginastra Wayan, Director of Sales & Marketing, Adiwana Hotels & Resorts, Indonesia
    • Ms. Raihan Tahir, CEO, Exzellent Profis Sdn Bhd, Malaysia
    • Ms. Maya Juwita, Workplace Gender Equality Director, AusAid Investing in Women Initiative, Philippines (virtually)

GUIDING QUESTIONS

  • Which behavioural barriers (e.g., lack of time, perceived complexity, discrimination) have you found to constrain up-/reskilling in your country (from the perspective of learners, firms and/or training providers)?
  • Considering the existence of behavioural barriers to up-/reskilling, which strategies can the private and public sector pursue to promote up-/reskilling, especially for smaller firms and vulnerable workers (incl. women)? For example:
    • How can engaging in up-/reskilling be made easier (e.g., better access to information, reduce frictions in the process, etc.)?
    • How to leverage “good practice” firms and training providers to drive change?
    • How to change stakeholder’s perceptions of benefits and costs of engaging in up-/reskilling (e.g., reduce uncertainty of benefits)?

BREAKOUT SESSION 3B: DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION IN TVET: BUILDING READINESS AND RESILIENCE IN THE ASEAN REGION

Moderator: Mr. Laki Kondylas, Deputy Director, Centre for Cyber Security Research and Innovation, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), Australia

OBJECTIVE

This session will discuss the impact of digital technologies on TVET systems in the ASEAN region with regard to reskilling and upskilling. Participants will also explore the opportunities to embrace digitisation to improve learning and teaching, the student experience and industry engagement. It examines what `readiness' and `resilience' look like from the perspective of infrastructure, systems and mindset within TVET.

KICK-OFF PRESENTATION/SPEAKER:

PANEL DISCUSSION

    • Ms. Sarinah Binti Ziziumiza, Head of Centre of Technology Enhanced Learning/ Senior Technical Instructor, Institute of Brunei Technical Education, Ministry of Education, Brunei
    • Ms. Dwi Cahyaningtyas, Lecturer, Politeknik Internasional Bali, Indonesia
    • Dr. Umawathy Techanamurthy, Senior Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Department of Engineering Education, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, National University of Malaysia, Malaysia (virtually)

GUIDING QUESTIONS

    • Why does digital readiness matter in TVET?
    • What are some practical things TVET institutions can do to improve their digital readiness and performance?
    • What are the biggest opportunities presented by digital in TVET?
    • What are the best examples you have seen of institutions that are “digitally ready”and why?

 PLENARY SESSION 5: REFLECTION AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

1. Sharing Session: Brunei Darussalam

2. Breakout Session 1B: Reskilling and upskilling towards a green transition